When you live in Texas as a non-citizen, you must work hard at staying on the right side of the law or risk the potential threat of detention or deportation. Any drug-related criminal offense, including those involving marijuana, has the capacity to lead to detention or deportation. 

According to the Drug Policy Alliance, you may experience considerable hardship if a drug offense leads to deportation. You may have to return to your country of origin, even if you have no family, job prospects or other ties in that nation. You may, too, find that you are unable to reenter the United States once you receive a drug violation as a non-citizen. 

Statistics surrounding drug-related deportations of non-citizens 

Between 2007 and 2012, more than 250,000 non-citizens underwent deportation from the United States as a result of drug violations. Deportations stemming from drug possession offenses are also rising substantially. Within that same span, the number of non-citizens who underwent deportation from the United States due to drug possession violations increased by 43%. 

Statistics surrounding marijuana possession-related deportations 

In 2012 and 2013, the United States deported more than 13,000 people as a result of marijuana possession violations. Simple possession of marijuana was the most common drug-related cause of deportation in 2013. It was also the fourth-most-common cause of deportations for any offense, drug-related or otherwise. 

Statistics surrounding race and drug-related deportation 

You face an elevated risk of facing sanctions or deportation after a drug offense if you identify as a person of color. Research shows you are more likely to be the subject of drug enforcement efforts if you are non-white. As a person of color, you are also more likely to face a harsh sentence following a drug violation.